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20110731
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
and small question. would you agree, ms. brooks, that part of the public concern here is about the closeness of the police and now politicians to "news of the world" and "news international?" >> i think that the public's concern overwhelmingly is the on the interception of voice mails is the idea that anybody could intercept the voice mails of victims of crime, and i think that is the overwhelming concern. >> but there has been a lot of concern voiced over the closeness of the police and the politicians and the "news of the world" and "news international" wouldn't you agree as a matter of fact? >> well, i have seen that "news of the world" has been singled out for that closeness so if you are going to address this and you know this more than anyone on the committee, because of your career as a journalist that it is wholly unfair in the discussing the closeness of police and politicians with the media to single out the "news of the world." >> well, it is a fact, and this has been a criticism and yet, you are on your watch as chief executive of "news international" have a triple whammy, becaus
including rebekah brooks and james murdock on 26 separate locations. my question is whether he can assure the house that the bid was not raised at any of those meetings. was there at any time he discussed the bid with officials of the culture? >> 10 days ago, the prime minister said i was not given any specific information that would lead you to change my mind. it would have made every effort to uncover the information. they made every effort for the facts. did would surely have led him to change his mind about mr. coulson. all would decline. he was accused of making payments to police. the prime minister did nothing with the information. in may of 2010, he warned the prime minister of bringing him into downing street. he did nothing. on september the fourth 2010, the new york times published an investigation " in most civil -- quoting multiple sources. we know that article is not enough to open their increase. we know it triggers the termination of the metropolitan police. that led to the author. he said it is right that it does not taken up. the question is why. the prime minister was c
of the world" and "the sun" was a part of it. >> thank you. >> miss brooks, rupert murdoch in his evidence session said quite clearly that the responsibility for the closure of "news of the world" lay fairly and squarely with senior management of that paper, which i assume that includes you. is that the case? >> i think -- i think i may have missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said it exactly how it was, that it was a collective decision. we all talked together. mr. murdoch was abroad at the time at a conference. we all talked together -- >> is that mr. murdoch senior? >> sorry, yes, rupert murdoch. yes. >> you wanted to say something else? >> no. sorry. >> when you were advising your staff that the paper was closing, during the private session, i think you said something like there was more to come. would you like to expand on what you meant by that? >> when i went down to the newsroom, to explain the decision, clearly and quite rightly, the journalists on the "news of the world" who very honorable journalists who have been putting out a newspaper under the scrutiny for
of the world." >> thank you. >> miss brooks, rupert murdoch in his evidence session said the responsibility for the closure of "news of the world" laid fairly and square leon the management of the newspaper, which would include you. is that the case? >> i think i may have missed that part of the evidence. i think mr. murdoch said is exactly how it was. it was a collective decision. we all talked together, and mr. murdoch was in with the board at the time, >> yes, rupert murdoch, yes. >> during the private session i think you said something like there was more to come. would you like to expand what you meant by that? >> when i went down to the newsroom to explain the decision, and clearly and quite rightly the journalists on the "news of the world" who are very honorable and journalists who will been putting out a newspaper under the scrutiny for a longtime and with great pride in their newspaper were very sad and baffled by management's decision to close the paper. what i was saying to them is that right now you may not be able to right at this moment understand why we've done it, but i thi
tell the house about the conversations she had about the bskyb bid with mr. murdoch and rebecca brooks? >> all the details of the meetings and explain all of the conversations were appropriate and she could ask the members of her party to be equally transparent. >> does the prime minister join me in hoping that this is the end of the ever increasing rise of misconduct by police officers across the country? >> the police have to have an operation, have to have a relationship with the media, both at the top level to communicate with the police's right to do strategically, and at the operational level to help them with crime. we have to try to make sure they do not have an inappropriate relationship. >> prime minister, have you ever mentioned the word "bskyb" in the presence of rebecca brooks? >> does not raise serious questions about how the previous limit operated that members opposite thought that it a prepared for the prime minister to be brief on police matters? and the e-mails that were released, didn't show how professional his chief of staff is? >> i thank my hon. friend for putti
in parliament about it and we carry that live on c-span2. we carry rupert murdoch and rebekah brooks yesterday and we will speak about that. how do you describe to an american audience the importance of "news of the world" as the largest selling sunday newspaper in the country, and the closure of that paper? guest: it was shocking. a lot of people were shocked by the closure. it was a sudden and brutal move, and murdoch's decided that enough was enough -- murdochs decided enough was enough and they had to take this extreme step. "news of the world" set the standard for tabloid journalism. it has been a pretty low standard for recent years, but they have always been in front, always seemed to be getting the best spooks, the best gossip -- best scoops, the best gossip. "news of the world" and "the sun," the murdoch daily tabloid, were the epitaph of tabloid journalism. -- epitome of tabloid journalism the rocket. raucous, titillating tabloid journalism, which we enjoy to extan extent. host: did you know, when you were living in london, rebekah brooks at all and her work? guest: she was editor of
? edited, by the way, at that time by rebecca brooks. they sent 20 scantily clad women to her office and had loads of photographs everywhere. they described the minister at the time as frumpy, dumpy, fat and ugly. there was humiliation as a form of coercion and then we heard yesterday, gordon brown, the former prime minister, talking about the fact that his disabled son, his son has cystic fibrosis, medical records for his son alleged by gordon brown in the house of commons yesterday, was stolen from a hospital by a criminal that he believes was working for "the sunday times" newspaper. so you have that kind of power. you have the ability to humiliate an mp and the ability to intervene in their personal life and that's why he was so forceful and powerful. i can tell you, andrea, until about three weeks ago, you couldn't count on five fingers the number of politicians who would stand up to rupert murdoch in britain because every single one of them was frightened of his influence. >> of course, gordon brown's little boy frazier is doing very well but it was at birth that that informati
summoned murdoch's son james and former "news of the world" editor rebecca brooks. >>> in london today, the parents of murdered teen milly met political leaders in parliament. salley and bob say the phone hacking investigation nuft look at politician's ties to the media, and dowlers say it fueled this. they were given false hope she was alive. it led to other disclosures of hacking or hacking attempts that reached all the way to the royal throne. >>> well, stocks are treading water today. the dow chips have been moving between positive and negative territory all morning. the dow jones down about 16 points or so. investors are perhaps taking a breather on negotiations over the debt ceiling playing out in washington. >>> president obama says there's a groundhog day feeling at the white house. he and congressional leaders immediate again today to work on a deal to raise the nation's borrowing limit. republicans are insisting on deep cuts only. the president wants to close tax loopholes as well. now, the debt ceiling deadline is three weeks from today. and so far, nobody is blinking. >>> i
than 100"÷"÷ million homes."÷"÷ created by cable, provided as a÷ public service."÷"÷ >>> rebecca brooks, the former"÷ chief executive of news"÷"÷ international, testified earlie÷ this week before a house of"÷"÷ commons committee. she"÷"÷ was questioned on her knowledge of phone hacking at"÷÷ "news of the world," alleged"÷"÷ payments made to police officers and to celebrity victims of"÷"÷ hacking. she was"÷"÷ also asked about"÷"÷ tampering with the voicemail of a teenage murder victim. >> we've now come to the second part of our session. i'd like to welcome ms. be rebecca brooks, recent chief executive officer at news international, and i'd like to thank you for your willingness to come before the committee. we are very much aware there is an ongoing police investigation which could lead to further proceedings, and we will bear that in mind, but we also appreciate your statement when you resigned from the company that you wanted to be as helpful as possible to various inquiries that are underway. could i just start then. news international issued a statement when you we
of pieces of that and told me he became a suspect. >> you were told rebecca brooks would be arrested? >> yes. >> how long before? >> 80 ten days? >> two days? >> i can't remember. but that is entirely proper. >> can we stick to resignations? [talking over each other] [inaudible] >> i was simply trying to ensure that the exchanges between the employment of mr. coulson, why would i want to risk anyone being accused of any compromise? i would not suggest for one moment -- why would i risk that compromise? my understanding is the advice from the senior official in number 10 and it is very sensible not to compromise people or leave a suggestion of compromise? >> it is not a question of keeping it secret from the home secretary. as commissioner of the metropolitan police, very substantial salary, you have great responsibilities and your predecessors had to tell the prime minister a lot of unpleasant things for many years. why is it this was a matter that you felt was something that you couldn't disclose? >> we were it is negative. let me remind you, wallace becoming a name in regards to packing, f
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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